eGovernment (SIGeGov)


Track Chairs:

Lemuria Carter, North Carolina A&T State University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Marijn Janssen, Delft University of Technology,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Initially viewed as an alternative service delivery mechanism, e-government is now considered as a key enabler of public sector transformation for effective governance and citizen participation in democratic processes and policy making. E-government covers a broad range of topics from the use of ICT for public service transformation to citizens’ acceptance of technology in dealing with government. While many countries have implemented exemplary strategies that have enabled them to realize benefits from e-government, others have struggled to cope with the diversity and complexity of implementation as well as adoption and diffusion. Further, although acknowledged as one of the most significant research themes to have emerged in the last decade, e-government has at times struggled to find its own niche in terms of theoretical relevance. It is often viewed as stemming from the IS field and in this respect, e-government has continued to have a major impact on IS theory and practice.

Minitracks:

E-Government - Past, Present, and Future

Vikas Jain, University of Tampa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for discussion and presentation of original research highlighting current issues related to technical, organizational, managerial and socio-economic aspects of e-Government adoption, evolution, implementation and impact. We seek to invite papers that address various aspects of e-Government projects from a theoretical, conceptual, or empirical perspective to set the stage for future research direction in e-Government. Both quantitative as well as qualitative studies on e-Government from developed and developing countries perspectives are encouraged.Almost a decade after the first e-Government implementations in the world were initiated, it is an opportune time to reflect on the past and present so that the future of e-Government can be charted out. There is a need to examine issues surrounding e-Government today and challenges for the future. The e-Government evolutionary models of the past may have become redundant in the face of rapidly changing technological options.

From Implementation to Adoption: Challenges to Successful E-Government Diffusion

Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Marijn Janssen, Delft University of Technology, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Lemuria D Carter, North Carolina A & T State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The aim of this minitrack is to provide a common platform for discussion and presentation of original research highlighting issues related with technical, organizational, managerial and socioeconomic aspects of e-government implementation and adoption from both the government and citizen’s perspective. The mini-track will focus on themes such different process, information systems and technology integration approaches in the context of e-government implementation; transformational government projects; IT-Governance, integrated service delivery and reengineering of the public sector; barriers to awareness, adoption and diffusion of e-government services; innovative applications and best practices in e-government; socio-economic determinants in encouraging adoption and diffusion of e-government services; policy and strategy to create and disseminate successful e-government services; e-government and digital divide; big data and open government.

ICT-enabled Crisis, Disaster, and Catastrophe Management

Hans Jochen Scholl, University of Washington - Seattle Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Akemi Takeoka, Charfield University of Wollongong, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The frequency and devastating impacts of natural and man-made crises and disasters, and even extreme events, have markedly increased over the past two decades, making this a major concern and timely topic for national and global research. Information and communication technology (ICT) plays an increasingly important role in all phases of adaptive and agile crisis response and management. This minitrack contributes to the discussion in the AMCIS community about ICTs in crisis preparedness and response management by creating a space for discourse about the role of information systems throughout crises, disasters, and catastrophes (including crisis informatics).

Social Media in the Public Sector

Laurence Brooks, Brunel University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Panos Panagiotopoulos, Brunel University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Rony Medaglia, Copenhagen Business School, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track invites papers that use case studies, surveys or other methods to advance our understanding of social media in the public sector. In particular, we welcome papers that attempt to provide new insights through theories, models or online research data collection methods and social media analytics.During the last few years, public sector organizations have experimented with the broad spectrum of social media applications. Social networking sites, blogging, microblogging, wikis and other Web 2.0/3.0 tools have been deployed to support the work of public administration and enhance the creation and delivery of value to the public.  These tools have been considered as a source of significant innovation that can even enable new types of relationships with citizens and other government stakeholders. The objectives and value proposition of social media in the public sector seem to be dynamically evolving along the social and technical characteristics of the tools themselves.