Service Systems


Track Chairs:

Yongjin Kim, Sogang University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jim Spohrer, IBM,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The goal of this track is to further existing knowledge and understanding of service systems, service systems design, productivity improvement, innovation, and offer implications for research and practice. A service system is a mechanism, i.e., an organically connected set of interacting components, which deals with the design, production, distribution and consumption of services in a particular situation. The service system consists of customers, services and products, suppliers, partners, and their relationships to resources and capabilities. It addresses the problems of service provision for which the components of the system interact with each other. Its goals include the maximization of service quality and service productivity, and service innovation. It is imperative to study the very nature of service and its systems in the knowledge-based economy from an integrated perspective to develop a systematic way of understanding the nature of service in the knowledge-based economy and build an integrated theory of service systems which facilitates service innovation and improves service productivity.  This track aims to extend our understanding of service systems and service networks to enhance the theoretical foundation for future research and to provide guidance to practitioners.

Minitracks:

Service Mining

Wei-Lun Chang, Tamkang University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Yen-Hao Hsieh, Tamkang University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Service mining, which is novel, addressing several research areas from the viewpoints of technology, model, management, and application. Service mining is defined as “a systematical process including service discovery, service experience, service recovery and service retention to discover unique patterns and exceptional values within the existing service pool. The goal of service mining is similar to data mining, text mining or web mining which aims to “detect something new” from the service pool. The major difference is the feature of service which is quite distinct to mining target such as data or text. In other words, service is a process of value co-creation and different by various perception of customer. In the concept of service mining, the mining target is not only the traditional services but also IT-based services. Service mining covers five elements: infrastructure, technology, model, management, and application. Service mining covers beyond the existing service management and is considered as a branch of service science.

Service Systems Design and Innovation

Jaeki Song, Texas Tech University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jeff Baker, American University of Sharjah, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The global economy is being rapidly transformed into a service-oriented economy – service and its systems innovations are critical for the success of firms, and new ways to design and deliver services become vital for obtaining competitive advantage.  In this transformational era of business, researchers have highlighted the need for better theorizing regarding services (Rai and Sambamurthy 2006) and service systems (Kim and Nam, 2009).   Even the traditional concepts of services and goods have been challenged, with researchers noting that when goods are the delivery medium for services, all exchanges in the economy become, in essence, service-for-service (Vargo and Lusch 2004).   In this new conceptualization, understanding the roles of goods and services, and of customers and partners, is vital in the process of value creation. In addition, understanding the systems through which services are designed, delivered, and operated is critical for the success of business innovation.

The conceptualization of service in information technology (IT) and service systems supported by ICT is on-going process.  Researchers and practitioners need to better understand the new value of proposition of IT in a service oriented economy (Barrett et al., 2011) and the impact of the innovation of service systems on firm performance (Kim and Nam, 2009).