ICTs in Global Development (SIGGlobDev)


Track Chairs:

Narcyz Roztocki, State University of New York at New Paltz,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

H. Roland Weistroffer, Virginia Commonwealth University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have a major impact on economic and societal development. Though developing, emerging, and transitional economies play an increasingly important role in the global market, mainstream information systems research continues to focus on the relatively small group of countries with highly developed economies. The business, social, and legal environments of developing, emerging, and transitional economies often mandate that ICT implementation and management apply different practices and models from those conceived and tested in highly developed countries. The intention of this track is to encourage more research and publications on ICT focused on developing and emerging markets and communities.

Thus, this track serves as a forum for research on the appropriate use and diffusion of information and communication technologies and associated management practices in the distinctive environments of developing, emerging, and transitional economies.

Minitracks:

Education and ICT in Developing Regions

Sergey Butakov, Concordia University - College of Alberta, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Bobby Swar, SolBridge International School of Business, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

ICT can be considered to be a major tool for improving the accessibility and efficiency of education in developing countries. ICT can also be viewed as a “flat world” enabler by providing access to the latest educational content developed all over the world. However, despite many promising efforts there is still a significant digital divide between educational institutions located in developing and developed countries. This includes policy and infrastructure gaps, lack of training facilities and trained maintenance personnel, limited community participation, gender related issues, ICT access issues, etc.

Special circumstances, challenges, and rewards of ICT projects in the educational sector in developing regions have created a unique ecosystem for such projects with many stakeholders, ranging from government institutions to private companies and individual entrepreneurs. This minitrack aims to facilitate the discussion on topics related to education and ICT in developing regions. Original research papers that address such topics are invited to this minitrack.

ICT Collaboration in Cross-Organizational, International, and Global Settings

Maria Madlberger, Webster University Vienna, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

With increasing integration of corporations, public authorities, non-profit organizations, project teams, and individuals in cross-organizational, international and global settings, ICT collaboration is getting increasingly relevant. Cross-organizational and particularly international and global collaboration is much more complex than within one single organization. Critical success factors of ICT collaboration in such settings are for example physical locations of collaborating partners, varying levels of ICT infrastructure, cultural similarity or differences, legal regulations or the economic environment. The role of ICT in cross-organizational, international, and global collaboration is twofold: ICT can be a collaboration enabler, but also a collaboration purpose and goal. This mini-track focuses on conceptual and empirical research that contributes to a clearer understanding of ICT collaboration processes, their challenges, success factors, and benefits in cross-organizational, international, or global settings. All methodological approaches, including case studies, surveys, literature reviews, design science etc. are welcome.

ICT in Emerging Markets

Shana R Ponelis, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Marlene A Holmner, University of PretoriaCreate, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Emerging market countries are poised for explosive growth. Although these countries, which include Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, Mexico, Argentina, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia and Turkey amongst others, currently account for approximately 20 percent of the world's economy, the prediction is that this figure will grow to 50 percent within 25 years. Emerging markets countries are enthusiastically adopting and adapting ICTs to solve their real-world problems.  Even so these countries have different requirements and pose unique challenges compared to the mature, developed countries. Conversely, developed economies can also benefit from the innovative uses to which ICT is put in emerging market countries, for example, mobile phone-based money transfer. Increasing our understanding of the possibilities and limitations of ICT and how to promote its adoption, adaptation and use in emerging markets is therefore of vital interest to information systems researchers and practitioners.

ICT in the Middle East

Mazen Ali, University of Bahrain, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Yousef Salim AlHinai, Sultan Qaboos University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Over the last few decades much of the Information Systems (IS) research has been focused on developed countries. While more recently there has been a noticeable increase in the number of IS studies in developing countries, these studies have mainly been specific to East Asian and Pacific countries. IS research in the context of Middle Eastern countries has been overlooked. Middle Eastern countries such as Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Egypt to name a few, have witnessed a tremendous growth in ICT development but research has been limited. These countries have different social, economical and cultural context compared to East Asian and other developing and developed countries. Better understanding adoption of ICT and the issues faced by these countries in the process of implementation would help practitioners in the Middle East and be a valuable contribution to the IS field. Therefore, the objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for IS professionals and academics doing research on ICT in Middle Eastern countries to share and discuss their work.

ICT in Transition Economies

Paulo Rupino, Cunha University of Coimbra, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Piotr Soja, Cracow University of Economics, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Transition economies are a particular case of emerging economies, including countries from the former eastern bloc and those that resulted from the breakup of the Soviet Union, which, in the last two decades, have abandoned the communist-style central planning system and committed to substantial reforms to adopt a free market approach. These fast growing transition economies play an increasingly significant role in the global market, with information and communication technologies (ICT) being a key driving force in this process. However, despite their growing importance, research that specifically addresses the specificities and different challenges of ICT in transition economies is still scarce, when compared with the body of knowledge for developed countries. The objective of this mini-track is to promote advances and dissemination of work done in this area.

ICT Issues for Developing Economies

Francis K Andoh-Baidoo, University of Texas - Pan American, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

K. Niki Kunene, University of Louisville, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The term developing economy refers to countries with low per capita income that typically lack a competitive industrial and commercial base and well developed infrastructure. Furthermore these countries often are characterized by weak and undetermined authorities. Many of these countries rank consistently low in various comparative studies, such as the Human Development Index, compiled by the United Nations Development Program. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are potentially important enablers for socio-economic development and may address many of the problem issues in developing countries, such as help in providing better health care and educational opportunities, and thereby contribute to the growth in per capita income. However, the implementation of ICT is typically more challenging and costly than in more mature, developed economies, and a high level of adaptability and creativity is required. The objective of this minitrack is to provide a forum to interested researchers for presenting and discussing these ICT issues specific to developing economies.

ICT issues in Africa

Elizabeth Ayalew, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Peter Meso, Georgia Gwinnett College, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Godwin J Udo, University of Texas at El Paso, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are a necessity for developing economies because it is the primary means of communications. Institutions that do not avail themselves to the digital economy and its associated infrastructure will find it extremely difficult to compete with the rest of the world. However, several prevailing conditions can hinder or accelerate the adoption, usage, management and governance of ICT in a given nation.

Africa is a giant continent with 1/6 of the global population. And Sub-Saharan Africa, in particular, lags behind both in economic development as well as its use of ICT. Yet there is evidence that a handful of successful ICT implementations are beginning to emerge across some African countries. However, research on the use of ICT in Sub-Saharan Africa remains thin.

This mini track seeks to bridge this gap in order for academicians and practitioners to reflect on the transfer, diffusion and adoption of ICT within the African context.

Information Technology as a Driver for Social and Political Change

Sergey V Samoilenko, Virginia Union University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

One of the endemic difficulties of inquiring into the impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is associated with the complexity of undertaking, namely, with the presence of multiple, interrelated routes by which ICTs impact a socio-economic environment of any country. Not all areas of the impact of ICTs received equal attention of the investigators. The current consensus is that existing capital stock and infrastructure, a level of investments, the amount and quality of the available human capital, as well as efficiency and effectiveness of the utilization of ICTs are among the variables that affect the level of the impact. However, socio-political implications of ICTs, which are instrumental to the success of economic outcomes, received much less attention and research in this area remains scarce. Consequently, much less is known regarding the impact of ICTs on social, cultural, and political environments. The purpose of this mini-track is to serve as a forum for discussion of the impact of ICTs as a driver of social, cultural, and political change in modern economies.

Sustainable ICT Initiatives in Rural and Transitional Economies in Emerging Countries

Linda Jo Calloway, Pace University - New York, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Joseph Cazier, Appalachian State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Information and Communications Technologies provide the information backbone for all sorts of sustainable initiatives in rural economies and emerging areas.  It is likely that the earth will need to sustain perhaps another billion people in the next decade, let alone to create sustainable livelihoods in the next century.  This track will gather together research and position papers, educational materials, conceptual models and cases on ICT initiatives aimed at economic, social and/or environmental sustainability. This track also seeks submissions concerned with both positive and negative collateral effects of these ICT initiatives. Suggested topics for this minitrack include but are not limited to:

Understanding collateral effects of ICT initiatives an interventions
Managerial and organizational requirements for supporting effective ICT initiatives
Measuring the effects on economic, social and environmental concerns from ICT interventions and initiatives
Categorizing the effects of economic, social and environmental ICT implementations
Case studies of ICT initiatives (such as introducing the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange, or the Solar Power initiatives in Ghana and elsewhere).
The roles of ICT in creating sustainable livelihoods for the next decade and the next century.