Social-Technical Issues and Social Inclusion (SIGSI)


Track Chairs:

Karen Patten, University of South Carolina,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Eileen Trauth, Pennsylvania State University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The Social-Technical Issues and Social Inclusion track focuses on information systems research areas impacting the intersection of humans and technology. It provides a venue for scholars of multiple Information Systems research areas to present research related to a broad range of social-technical issues as well as social inclusion issues. This track establishes an area for interested researchers to establish platforms for future research leading to comprehensive research streams dealing with information systems and social, ethical, political, and cultural aspects.

This track also partners with the relatively new SIG – Social Inclusion, which focus on issues relating to diversity and social exclusion. The track also addresses under-represented groups within the IT field whether producers or consumers of information systems and technology. This partnership provides a greater awareness and an opportunity to focus related research into a more comprehensive research stream.

Social-Technical Issues and Social Inclusion track solicits research papers (conceptual, theoretical, and empirical) as well as case studies, research-in-progress, and best practices / lessons learned.

Minitracks:

The Dark Side of Social Networking -- Social and Ethical Issues

Bo Sophia Xiao, Hong Kong Baptist University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Christy M.K. Cheung, Hong Kong Baptist University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Matthew K.O. Lee, City University of Hong Kong, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of online social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, YouTube, and more recently Google+. By facilitating the establishment and maintenance of social relations as well as the sharing of interests and activities within individual networks, social networking sites have become increasing integrated in our modern culture, changing the way we work, study, play and socialize, and how we spend time and money.

Notwithstanding the many benefits offered by online social networks, their use raises a variety of social and ethical concerns (e.g., privacy and security threats, cyber-bullying, addiction, deception, cyber-loafing, censorship and surveillance). The objective of this mini-track is to develop theoretical insights and understanding on topics and issues that address the troubling or dark side of online social networks. We welcome conceptual, theoretical, and empirical papers that enrich our understanding of the social and ethical issues of online social networks.

Research in Social Media

Subhasish Dasgupta, George Washington University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

In recent years we have witnessed phenomenal growth in social media. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, social media refers to forms of electronic communication (as Web sites for social networking and microblogging) through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content such as videos.  As more and more people spend time creating and disseminating information using social media, there is an increasing need for research in this area.  The significance of these communities is evident by the impact they have on information generation and transmission, and socialization. For example, today, blogs, Twitter, and video sharing sites such as YouTube are quickly becoming a primary source of information in a variety of domains. The Research in Social Media track will cover all aspects of social media including social, cultural, organizational, human, and cognitive issues.

Social Aspects of Social Networking

Laurence Brooks, Brunel University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Roman Brandtweiner, Vienna University of Economics and Business, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University - Bloomington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Social Networking, as exemplified in the ‘Web 2.0 concept’ by online applications such as MySpace, Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Bebo, Hi5, Friendster, Gather, 43 Things, etc., have been making headlines in the national newspapers (Lanchester, 2006), not only for their high profile acquisition by major media companies, but also for their ability to potentially create a whole new revenue stream, create a new exploitation route or even influence the outcome of the US presidential nomination race (Stelter, 2008). These technologies have now become accepted.

While the technology is important, as without this the whole phenomena would not exist, the interesting and challenging element of social networking is what people do with it, ie. the social aspect. This track aims to bring together related articles (theoretical and empirical papers, including survey and case/field study research papers) that address the concept of social networking and related phenomena.

Social Inclusion

Eileen M. Trauth, Penn State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track welcomes relevant theoretical, empirical, and intervention research, in either full paper or research-in-progress format, that relates to the mission of SIG Social Inclusion (SIGSI). The purpose of SIGSI is to promote research, pedagogy, and outreach on all aspects of social inclusion in the field of Information Systems (IS). The goal of such efforts is to stimulate greater diversity of thought and personnel in AIS and the IS field overall, and participation of all our members in a more socially-aware and inclusive discipline. Social inclusion research includes topics such as the gender gap in the IS field, gender minorities (e.g. LGBT community), intersectionality of identities (such as ethnicity, gender and socio-economic class), the digital divide, underserved groups in the information society (such as persons with disability), and a range of topics related to human diversity, and the “haves” and “have nots” in the information society.

Social Theory in Information Systems Research

Pnina Fichman, Indiana University - Bloomington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University - Bloomington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This Mini Track solicits papers that make use of social theory in information systems research that draws upon such approaches as sociotechnical theory, critical theory, social informatics, organizational theory, cultural anthropology, sociology and others. We want to highlight research that uses these approaches to critically examine the constitution of information and communications technologies, and their roles in organizations and society, the most important questions about IS, organizations, and society.  We particularly invite IS research that applies, builds on, compares, or critiques these social theories.

We are interested in high quality empirical and conceptual work that uses social theory to study and theorize about application domains including social networks, cyberinfrastructure, and online communities; large scale phenomena such as computer-mediated communication, crowdsourcing, hacktivism, unintended consequences of technology implementation and use, scientific collaboration and scholarly communication and social computing; and organizational phenomena including virtual teams, communities of practice and technology use on organizations.