IT Project Management (SIGITProjMgmt)


Track Chairs:

Alanah Mitchell, Appalachian State University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Lorraine Lee, University of North Carolina Wilmington,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Unfortunately, IT projects have become notorious for high failure rates or having significant cost or budget overruns. Both research and anecdotal evidence suggests that many IT projects struggle to meet functionality and quality targets. Research has identified multiple reasons for these challenges in IT projects, such as: project escalation, poor risk management, failure to manage user expectations, poor software development or project management processes, or inability to learn from past mistakes and successes. As a research community, there is still much to be learned and discussed about improving success rates for IT projects.

The IT Project Management track will feature research that focus on research across many traditional IS/IT project management areas, including, but not limited to virtual project management; agile project management; outsourcing or distributed projects; learning from projects; project success or best practices; project management methodologies; project quality metrics or standards; pedagogical issues.

Minitracks:

Agile Project Management

Meghann L Drury, Fordham University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Orla O'Dwyer, National University of Ireland, Galway, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Agile methodologies such as eXtreme Programming (XP) and SCRUM strive to reduce the cost of change throughout the software development process. Even though there have been many success stories with the adoption of agile methodologies, managers of such project teams are challenged to align their traditional methodologies and tools to those of agile methodologies. This may be due to some fundamental differences in their approach to control, change, decision-making, team structure and communication.

Agile methodologies rely heavily on teams and teamwork. Therefore, management must develop a better understanding of the factors that help teams using agile methodologies drive project success. These may include selecting appropriate personnel for the team; creating an open work environment; ensuring correct decisions are made; encouraging continuous communication with the customer, and establishing evaluation and reward systems based on team performance.

A further difficulty for organisations relates to the management of a potentially diverse range of agile projects at portfolio level. Agile project portfolio management provides opportunities that a traditional project portfolio would not allow such as more transparent metrics, more frequent management review meetings, and quicker readjustment of project priorities and resources.

We are seeking high quality research papers for this track that investigate various aspects of agile project management. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

Challenges implementing agile methodologies
Managing co-located, virtual and/or distributed agile teams
Decision-making and governance in agile teams
Communication and interaction on agile teams
Culture of agile teams
Best practices in agile project management
Evaluation and reward systems used by agile teams
Agile project portfolio management
Trends in agile project management

Project Management Education

Michael Cuellar, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Learning to be a project manager in the information systems world is often an informal process. The informal nature of project management training resulted in project managers not possessing all the skills they should have to be successful. Academia has attempted to address this gap by the development of project management courses. This effort however has resulted in a number of questions about how this should be undertaken. What discipline should house the project management course. Should project management be a required course? an elective? cross disciplinary? replicated for the different disciplines?  What should the content be? How should certification factor in? How should it be taught? The purpose of this mini-track is to provide a forum to exchange ideas and experience in these areas. Participants in this mini-track should receive practical advice on how to address these areas and take away ideas on how to improve their courses and curricula.

Project Management in Developing & Emerging Economies

Corlane Barclay, University of Technology Jamaica, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sheryl Thompson, University of the West Indies, Western Jamaica Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Kweku Muata Osei-Bryson, Virginia Commonwealth University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Information & Communication technologies (ICT) and other types of IT projects are typically faced with numerous challenges and obstacles. These are further magnified in developing and emerging countries where there is likelihood that best practices and methodologies are not consistently applied or widely dispersed across organizations and sectors. Effective project management approaches have great potential for revitalizing the sluggish and ineffective management practices often encountered in developing countries (Stuckenbruck & Zomorrodian, 1987). However, some of the barriers to the successful execution of projects in developing countries include political and social systems, lack of financial support, cultural blocks (Nguyen, 2007) and sufficient access to qualified practitioners. Despite these challenges, these regions have much to offer, through interesting and unique experiences, and insights from experience in practice. This was further reinforced by Mia and Ramage (2011) in their investigation of IT Project Management in the microfinance sector of Bangladesh.

The objective of this mini-track is to foster discourse on important issues, challenges and opportunities within the IT project management domain from the perspectives of developing and emerging economies as both attempt to improve and harness project management capabilities. Researchers, graduate students and practitioners’ submissions of completed and work in progress research, cases and industry insights are welcomed.

Project Management in Small Shops - The Need for a Learning Approach

Jacob Nørbjerg, Copenhagen Business School, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jeff Babb, West Texas A & M University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More than 80% of US software developing companies have less than 10 employees. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the software project practices and challenges of these companies. Moreover, we have much to learn about how the practices and concepts of IT project management have bearing on the less formalized and systematic approaches typical for small software shops. Traditional guidelines, methods, and tools for project management fit poorly to the practices and needs of these small companies. Even adopting modern agile practices appear to be challenging in this context. It has been suggested, that a learning approach, allowing small shops to adopt and adapt practices “a la carte"" might be the best approach towards small shops.

The purpose of this mini-track is to focus on challenges and practices of small shop Information Systems Development and propose suitable methods and techniques.

Resource Leveling: Problems & Solutions

Michael A Chilton, Kansas State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track focuses on the issue of scheduling under the constraint of limited resources in a multi-project environment. "Despite ... a plethora of PM software tools and extensive research in the area of resource-constrained project scheduling during the past several years, it is still often the case that projects do not come in on time and on budget." (Herroelen & Leus, 2005, p.102)  Scholars have devised algorithms and heuristics to assist the problem of scheduling under limited resources, but many of these studies apply only to simple projects that are further restricted by a number of simplifying assumptions.  PERT/CPM techniques identify a critical path, but the critical path assumes that unlimited resources are available.  Further, managers seem to think that the critical path determines the project length and that these tasks require the most attention.  This may not always be the case, and so additional research is needed to explore this problem.  Papers are invited that deal with topics of project management as they relate to resource leveling, assignment and scheduling.  The focus of this mini-track is on the allocation and scheduling of resources to tasks within a multi-project IT shop.