Information Systems Usage and Application in Asia


Track Chairs:

Aaron French, Kyungpook National University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

John Guo, James Madison University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Dan Kim, University of North Texas,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The track welcomes submissions that relate to all aspects of global IS, or IS research situated in a global, international or cross-cultural context. The track is open to all methodological approaches and perspectives.  Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: research that considers the impacts of cultural values (e.g. on systems use, adoption or development); research on global IT sourcing strategies; single country studies showing implications for other locations or results different from other contexts (e.g. impact of IT policies on a transition economy); multi-country studies of IS adoption, use, and development (e.g. ERP implementations involving multiple countries); cross-national and cross-cultural comparisons of IS adoption, use and development (e.g. ERP diffusion and impacts compared between different economies); issues relating to the globally distributed teams (e.g. the adoption and use of social media by cross-national virtual teams); issues relating to IT adoption at the national level (e.g. IT infrastructure sophistication across countries); and issues relating to cross-national legislation and regulation (e.g. implications of different data protection laws in the EU vs. US or Asian countries).

Minitracks:

Community Wireless Innovations and Networks

Abdelnasser Abdelaal Ibri, College of Applied Sciences, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Hundreds of community, and municipal, wirelesses networks (CWNs) have been established across the world. CWNs are community-centered telecommunication infrastructures that integrate and employ resources of local communities, volunteers, local businesses, municipalities, and technology vendors to build and maintain the infrastructures. Their objectives could be boosting community development, enhancing municipal services, improving civic engagement, achieving digital inclusion, and/or improving the overall socioeconomic conditions of local communities. Developers of CWNs usually develop applications, build off-the-shelf antennas and hardware, and develop applications and software to run the system. This is because CWNs may be the only viable solution for building information highways for delivering e-government, e-commerce, e-learning, e-health, and entertainment services to remote and underserved communities. Such communities usually lack the commercial incentives necessary to attract telecommunication companies.

This minitrack would be a scientific venue devoted for discussing emerging innovations, applications, design considerations, and implementation models. It will also discuss funding opportunities, innovative approaches for revenue generation, and economic, legal, ethical and social issues of these emerging networks.

Secure Computing in China

Yu "Andy" Wu, University of North Texas, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Information security is critical to successful and safe use of information systems and applications. Globalization creates tremendous opportunities for effective and novel use of information systems, but in the mean time poses particular challenges for information security (Wibowo & Batra, 2010, <em>Competition Forum</em> 8[1]). Whereas information flow knows no geopolitical boundaries, management of technologies and information security takes place at organizations residing in different countries. Due to differences in demographics, history, culture, political system, and regulation environment, successful information security endeavors is not possible without sensitivity and attention to these differences and their implications. China, with its vast IT infrastructure and numerous corporate systems, provides a suitable backdrop for studying such implications. This minitrack encourages academic research examining management of information security in contexts germane to organizations in China.

Social Network Service (SNS) in Asia

Jongtae Yu, University of Utah, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Social Network Service (SNS) refers to web and mobile platform-based service facilitating social relationship and sharing among people such as Facebook and YouTube. A fast-growing number of subscribers in Asia actively use SNS to build personal relationships in the cyberspace. In consequent, SNS has substantially influenced social lives and reshaped social relationship. Further, SNS enables firms to develop relationship with their customers in new ways. Therefore, it is important to explore the impact of SNS on individuals and society as well as the opportunities and challenges toward firms. In this mini track, we welcome academic and practical studies addressing the following, but not limited to, facets of SNS issues in Asia: (1) the idiosyncrasies of SNS in Asian countries; (2) governmental support and control; (3) the impact of SNS on ethical issues; (4) implications of utilizing SNSs as a leverage in marketing strategy; (4) challenges of innovating SNS business model and securing profit sustainability; (5) technical and business innovations in Asian SNS landscape, (6) opportunities and challenges of SNS localization, and (7) cross-culture studies exploring distinctions of various social contexts usage or business activities.

Understanding the Emergence of South Korea as a Global IT Powerhouse

Chang E Koh, University of North Texas, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Namho Chung, Kyunghee University This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Kyungdoo "Ted" Nam, Konkuk University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Along with the emergence of Asia as a major economic region, the rapid adoption and use of IT in Asia has been recognized by the business and research communities. The rapid adoption of IT and growth of IT industry in South Korea is of particular interest. The latest ITU’s annual report ranks South Korea as the world’s most advanced ICT economy ahead of many European and North American nations. This unprecedented rise of this nation as a global IT powerhouse calls for in-depth research to understand what causes and drives the country to excel in IT. Such research would also provide valuable lessons for other nations to emulate.