Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology (SIGADIT)


Track Chairs:

Elizabeth White Baker, Wake Forest University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Marcus Rothenberger, University of Nevada Las Vegas,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Despite the prevalence of technology in business, diffusion and adoption of information technology (IT) remains a challenge with many research questions unanswered. The answers to these questions are valuable given that technology usage is a prerequisite for realizing the value from technology investments. Yet, despite the level of investment in IT, many still struggle to find the link between the adoption of the technology and its predictors and consequences.

The struggles with understanding the impact of IT is further complicated by the evolving world order. New technologies such as social media and cloud computing potentially change the nature and speed of diffusion. New organizational contexts such as inter‐organizational alliances, the push for e‐government, and the societal focus on IT‐enabled healthcare may also play a role. Further, the pervasiveness of IT in forms such as iPads and smartphones may change the types of individuals who adopt earlier (or later), affect the spread of innovations, or affect the types of technologies that are adopted. This track focuses on these and other issues related to the diffusion of IT. We welcome innovative research on this topic, especially papers that bridge the gap between academic and business thought.

Minitracks:

Diffusion of IS Innovations in Social Networks

Anand Jeyaraj, Wright State University - Main Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The diffusion of information systems (IS) innovations can be visualized as a process of communication by which members of a social system may become aware of IS innovations over time. The social system may comprise individuals or organizations, deal with formal or informal connections, exist for hedonic or instrumental purposes, structured as aristocratic or egalitarian networks, and based on strong or weak ties among members. Communication mechanisms and patterns within such social systems can vary considerably and can significantly affect the diffusion process over time. We solicit theoretical expositions and empirical investigations that deal with the diffusion of IS innovations.

Influence of Organization Climate on the Adoption and Diffusion of Emerging Information Technology

David M. Bourrie, Auburn University Main Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Chetan Sankar, Auburn University Main Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

L. Allison Jones-Farmer, Auburn University Main Campus, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The use of emerging information technology is increasingly becoming more vital to maintain a sustainable competitive advantage in the workplace.  This mini-track aims to expand our knowledge regarding the adoption and diffusion of emerging information technology by looking at the organization climate.  Organizational climate research is linked to the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of employees, information technology staff, and the top management teams that often represent their perception of organizational policies, practices, and procedures, and subsequent patterns of interactions and behaviors that affect the adoption and diffusion of emerging information technology.  Examples of emerging information technology include, but are not limited to business analytics, cloud computing, and iPads.

User Resistance to Information Technology

Sven Laumer, University of Bamberg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Andreas Eckhardt, Goethe University Frankfurt, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Christian Maier, University of Bamberg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Despite more than two decades of IS research on adoption and diffusion of IT, there is still no unified definition of resistance regarding the implementation and use of new information technology. There are only a few theories and models dealing with user resistance from an IS perspective. This is mainly due to the various causes and diverse forms resistance can take. The signs of resistance can be shown by the most varied groups of personnel – such as shop-floor workers, technical staff, management, and boards of directors – and the resultant modes of behavior can differ to a very large extent.

Challenges of this kind are acknowledged by the CIOs of top American companies for IT implementation. The management of change and the resistance connected to it is rated as the sixth most important challenge for CIOs in a survey of the Society for Information Management. Consequently, the objective of this mini-track is to provide valuable new insights of user resistance to information technology. The general idea of this mini-track is to explain, why individuals resist using a technology. The mini-track welcomes all different kinds of theoretical perspectives and research methodologies.