Global, International, and Cross Cultural Issues in IS (SIGCCRIS)


Track Chairs:

Monideepa Tarafdar, University of Toledo, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Edward Bernroider, Vienna University of Economics and Business,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Pnina Fichman, Indiana University Bloomington,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The track welcomes submissions that relate to all aspects of global IS, or IS research situated in a global, international or cross-cultural context. The track is open to all methodological approaches and perspectives.  Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: research that considers the impacts of cultural values (e.g. on systems use, adoption or development); research on global IT sourcing strategies; single country studies showing implications for other locations or results different from other contexts (e.g. impact of IT policies on a transition economy); multi-country studies of IS adoption, use, and development (e.g. ERP implementations involving multiple countries); cross-national and cross-cultural comparisons of IS adoption, use and development (e.g. ERP diffusion and impacts compared between different economies); issues relating to the globally distributed teams (e.g. the adoption and use of social media by cross-national virtual teams); issues relating to IT adoption at the national level (e.g. IT infrastructure sophistication across countries); and issues relating to cross-national legislation and regulation (e.g. implications of different data protection laws in the EU vs. US or Asian countries).

Minitracks:

Crowdsourced Content Production and Knowledge Repositories

Pnina Fichman, Indiana University - Bloomington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Noriko Hara, Indiana University - Bloomington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


With the advent of Web 2.0, many crowdsourced content production and repository sites, such as Wikipedia, YouTube, and Yahoo! Answers, are flourishing. Wikipedia, for example, became one of the top ten most popular websites. Many scholars have focused attention on information quality and processes of mass knowledge production, as well as the social aspects of these projects. However, significantly less attention has been given to their global nature. Wikipedia, for example, includes articles in 285 languages, Yahoo! Answers International is available in more than 25 languages, and YouTube in more than 60 languages. This global nature of such knowledge creation and content repository projects offers a rich socio-technical environment to examine international and cross cultural issues online. Previous studies are predisposed to primarily investigate the English version of these repositories, yet there is a need for more cross cultural research. The purpose of this minitrack is to showcase research on knowledge production projects that goes beyond their English versions. The minitrack welcomes both empirical and conceptual work and solicits innovative analysis of international and cross cultural aspects of these projects.

Information Governance in Business Ecosystems

Ingrid Schirmer, University of Hamburg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Matthias Goeken, Frankfurt am Main, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Paul Drews, University of Hamburg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Although information governance is an established subject to large scale companies, there has as yet been little research directed toward how information governance is managed within business ecosystems (from loosely coupled, short-term virtual enterprises to long-term strategic alliances). Due to an increased globalized delivery and demand of (sub) services/products, enterprises typically act in evolving networks of operational and managerial independent organizations. Examples are project networks, logistics chains, partners in supply chain, private-public partnerships or enterprise alliances. Business ecosystems (as well as their member organizations) share some characteristics like dependency on mutually accepted (often cross-national) policies, processes, cultures, infrastructure, etc. At the same time they have to adapt and change quickly, confronted with information governance and standardization challenges on an increasingly large scale. In particular, it is little understood how information governance tasks and values are to be managed and distributed in a step-by-step, partly national-specific and partly international manner.

Issues in Global Systems Implementation

Aakash Taneja, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

George Mangalaraj, Western Illinois University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Anil Singh, University of Texas at Brownsville, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Scholarly research in this area will provide an increased understanding of the issues salient to global information systems implementations. This mini-track invites research in the areas of global information systems development, implementation and usage.Globalization has spurred growth of trans-national and multi-national enterprises. These organizations thrive on the integration of disparate information systems spread around various countries. Implementation of such systems is fraught with challenges especially when the organization is venturing into developing and emerging economies. Mainstream IS research on systems implementations have focused on single organization/country implementations. Findings from such studies may not be directly transferable to implementations where country is just not a variable but provides the implementation context. For instance, infrastructure and technical skills associated with system implementation may not be available globally, making it necessary for organizations to make country specific adaptations to their global IS deployments. Likewise, laws may affect how these systems are implemented.

IT Culture and Values: Occupational, Organizational, and Societal

Indira R Guzman, Trident University International, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Michelle L Kaarst-Brown, Syracuse University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Possible topics include:The goal of research on culture and IT is diverse in both context and method. Our mini-track, now it its fifth year, addresses important cultural and value related aspects of information and communication technologies (ICT’s). Rather than focusing on cross-cultural studies that compare IT development and use in different countries, the focus of this mini-track is to provide a forum for research that seeks to understand the values and assumptions embedded in ICT’s, and held by the human groups served by ICT’s (i.e. occupational groups, organizations, and society).

Possible topics include:

Methodological issues conducting IT culture research, including case studies, ethnography, quantitative studies, mixed methodsIT culture, the information culture, the digital culture, the online culture, and the geek culture.
IT values and culture conflict in organizations and modern society
Ethnography and culture in virtual environments
Culture and values and ICT management
Software for supporting cultural studies
Culture and generational issues in IT use
Conflict resolution and culture change at the organizational and societal levels
The IT Occupational Culture; Socialization, cultural fit, and commitment of IT people
Culture and metaphors
Linking culture and information sharing
IT Culture and education
Measuring or identifying IT cultural patterns or value sets
Embedded cultural values in ICT’s

This minitrack is an attractive option of those who study culture and may not meet criteria for the cross-cultural special interest group, as well as others whose research would fall into general areas, or special interest groups.

Knowledge Management and Collaboration in Global Information Systems

Mahesh Raisinghani, Texas Woman’s University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

In learning from the past & charting the future of global information systems, the key question is what are the best and/or next practices in building a collaborative enterprise using global information systems? While global organizations recognize that information and knowledge are vital to their operation, they do not know the best way to identify, value, cost, manage and realize the benefits of their intellectual assets. This is probably due to a knowledge gap between theory and practice. Consequently, technology, hardware and software are often seen as solutions to the problem, rather than an increased focus on the content (data, information and knowledge). As more countries join the ranks of the industrialized nations, the sophistication of the global market and number of global competitors have eliminated any advantage to a simple presence in international markets. The focus of this mini-track will be on understanding the fundamental conditions of the industry and bridging the knowledge, gap in Global Information Systems. Suggested Topics: This AMCIS 2013 Mini-Track on Knowledge Management and Collaboration in Global Information Systems encourages the submission of quality papers and panel and workshop proposals dealing with (but not limited to) the following topics:

Best and Next practices in building a collaborative enterprise using global information systems
Managing intellectual capital in MNEs/Impacts of Social, Cultural, Political, and Economic Issues
Knowledge Management / Multinational IT Resource Management
Case studies of applications and lessons learned from success and failure in Knowledge Management and Collaboration in Global Information Systems
Comprehensive reviews of previous studies on knowledge management and collaborative technologies in global organizations.
Analyses of different research methods and their impact on the study of knowledge management and collaboration using global IT/IS in organizations and their contribution to theory
Global IT/IS to support innovation/creativity/knowledge management/ collaboration and the related governance issues (e.g., ODESK, ELANCE, LIVEOPS, INNOCENTIVE, TOPCODER, MECHANICAL TURK, CROWDFLOWER, CASTINGWORDS, SAMASOURCE, and so forth)