Enterprise Systems (SIGEntSys)


Track Chairs:

Carsten Brockman, University of Potsdam,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Randy V. Bradley, The University of Tennessee,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Renee Pratt, Washington & Lee University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The introduction, use and maintenance of enterprise systems (ES) require a significant investment of organizational energy and resources. As such, ES represent the largest IS investment an organization is likely to make. Many organizations are now upgrading, replacing, or extending their original ES. Early versions of ES provided back office functionality that integrated a range of internal business processes, whereas modern ES have evolved to include support for a variety of front office and inter-organizational activities and processes, such as customer relationship management (CRM) and supply chain management (SCM). The design of such large integrated systems represents a major technical challenge, requiring new ways of thinking about business processes, system development, and enterprise architecture.

Because of both their size and their integrated nature, ES are difficult to implement, and are associated with a variety of organizational changes. Organizations expect, but unfortunately do not always realize, significant benefits from their sizable investments in ES. Because of the importance of ES in organizations, educators continue to explore approaches for introducing ES into IS and other business curricula.

Minitracks:

Current Trends in ERP

Norbert Gronau, University of Potsdam, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jorge Gomez, University of Oldenburg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Karl Kurbel, Europa-Universität Viadrina, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Carsten Brockmann, University of Potsdam, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems have evolved from large monolithic systems installed on premise to more and more fragmented systems, distributing just about any aspect of a system: functions, processes, data, hardware and infrastructure. With the emergence of service-oriented architectures (SOA), ERP functionality has become available as software-as-a-service (SaaS), provided on-demand to clients via the Internet.

This change has gone hand in hand with the incorporation of more and more business functionality. In addition, ERP-related solutions such as SCM, SRM and CRM have been integrated, embedded or closely coupled with the ERP on-demand services.  Mobile access to ERP via smartphones and tablets has created new challenges. Technologies such as (RFID) have opened up new opportunities for an organization to act and react in real-time. For the new technologies to be successfully implemented, security issues need to be resolved, and a satisfactory level of trust in the technologies has to be created.

The rationale of this minitrack is exploration of new technologies that can further enhance enterprise resource planning. Papers presenting the development of prototypes as a proof of concept are welcome. Technology-oriented papers should give consideration to the business value of the proposed approaches or solutions.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) and other architectures for ERP
ERP-as-a-service, i.e. software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions for ERP
Impact of virtualization and infrastructure-as-a-service on ERP
ERP for small and medium-size enterprises
Integrating ERP and Office solutions
Integrating RFID solutions with ERP
Impact of the "Internet of things" on future ERP systems
Integrating legacy ERP systems with state-of-the-art components
Mobile ERP and related areas (e.g. mobile SCM, mobile CRM, mobile SRM)
Security issues and trust in new technologies for enterprise resource planning
Emerging technologies and tools that enhance Enterprise Systems
Integration of collaboration and social networking technologies with Enterprise Systems
Business process modelling tools that help in modelling Enterprise Systems processes
Solutions that leverage Enterprise Systems and real-time data analytics
Technology challenges in implementing and managing Enterprise Systems solutions that leverage the latest technology trends

Enterprise Architecture and Organizational Success

Frank J. Armour, American University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

J. Alberto Espinosa, American University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Stephen Kaisler, i_SW Corporation,Inc, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

William DeLone, American University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Peter Loos, Saarland University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This minitrack would help to advance the knowledge of EA; help to learn about effective processes and approaches to effectively manage the EA; and begin to identify ways to measure the organizational benefits derived from EA.Enterprise Architecting (EA) is the process of developing enterprise Information Technology architecture – both its description and its implementation. An EA description focuses on a holistic and integrated view of the why, where, and who uses IT systems and how and what they are used for within an organization. An enterprise architect (and his/her team) develops the strategy and enables the decisions for designing, developing, and deploying IT systems to support the business operations as well as to assess, select, and integrate the technology into the organization’s infrastructure. Alignment between business and IT has remained one of the top issues for CIOs and IS managers.

Enterprise System Adoption and Business Models

Katja Andresen Beuth, University of Applied Sciences, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Carsten Brockmann, University of Potsdam, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Piotr Soja, Cracow University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

J P Allen, University of San Francisco, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Enterprise systems (ES) are extremely complex software packages designed for integrating data flow across an entire company.  ES include an organization’s operations and have extended organizational boundaries and support interorganizational activities. Today’s enterprise systems are expected to support modern organizations that operate in dynamic business environments, compete in global markets, face mergers and takeovers, and participate in business alliances. Frequently, the adoption of an ES is challenging for an organization, due to system complexity, organizational context, and the people involved in the implementation project.  Moreover, ES adoption projects typically involve a large number of stakeholders representing different departments, various organizational hierarchies, and often external companies operating in various industries. These stakeholders may have conflicting interests, and their own definitions of project success. Overall, ES implementation projects tend to be very unique and challenging endeavors. ES providers have the challenge of delivering systems which are highly customizable software products and able to fit the needs of a variety of adopters. This is important since the issue of alignment between ES and adopting organizations is one of the determinants of successful enterprise system implementation. This mini-track invites theoretical and empirical papers that examine various aspects related to the determinants of ES success and business models.

Enterprise Systems and Cloud Computing

Al Bento, University of Baltimore, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Anil Aggarwal, University of Baltimore, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track invites relevant contributions of theoretical frameworks, empirical studies, and practical experiences of enterprise systems in the Cloud. It aims to receive submissions that add to the understanding of enterprise systems in the Cloud, and address many of the issues related to change management, security, management and processing approaches related to the move to the Cloud. A key objective is to provide an open forum for all aspects of enterprise systems in the Cloud, including their possible changes to organizations and management. A final objective is to receive contributions on possible links between mobile computing (smartphones, tablets, 4G) and enterprise systems in the Cloud.

User Experience of Enterprise Systems

Honglei Li, Northumbria University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

User experience refers to the subjective, dynamic and emotional side of technology usage. Originating from the practical side of interface design, user experience has recently been penetrating into the academic field mainly because of the recent design stream alongside burgeoning social computing devices such as iPad, tablet PCs and smartphones. Given this fact, many new software product developments focus on holistic user experience from user’s perspective to improve product quality as well as the overall business performance. With this wave of new user experience design, the software design has shifted from function-centred to user experience centred. However, the interfaces of most enterprise systems, such as ERP systems are still in its legacy state. This mini-track aims at exploring the user experience perspective of enterprise systems to find solutions to tackle the issue of legacy interface of enterprise systems.

Very Large Business Applications (VLBA) – Issues and Answers

Holger Schrödl, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Klaus Turowski, MRCC, University of Magdeburg, Germany, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Emerging technologies like mash-ups, web 2.0 and cloud computing on the one side and the increasing agility of business models on the other side raises the question how Enterprise Systems will look like in the future. Therefore, we see a new class of Enterprise Systems which address the need for more agility in the entire value chain with a loosely coupled system of distinct elements, orchestrated to a highly integrated, complex Information System (Very Large Business Applications, VLBA).

VLBA act as enabler for intra- and interorganisational business processes and play a significant role in the development of new business models. This Mini-Track aims at studying, grounding, and finally exploiting the potential of VLBA to solve integration and coordination problems in distributed business processes as a key enabler of flexible boundaryless information systems.

Key research questions are:

How to represent VLBA in service-based information systems by employing and adapting constructs, models, and methods of different information systems technology stacks?
How to coordinate software services by employing and adapting approaches for service discovery and composition?
How to negotiate and agree upon the delivery of software-based services (SLA)?
Howto control the delivery of software-based services in VLBA by measuring efficiency and effectiveness?

Topics relevant for this mini-track include, but are not limited to, the following:

Cloud Computing and VLBA
VLBA Operations Management
Strategic, tactic and operative Systems Landscape Engineering
VLBA Business Simulations
VLBA Business Models
Analytical Business Process Engineering for VLBA
VLBA and Knowledge Management
VLBA security issues
Innovative VLBA Applications

We invite contributions from different disciplines including information systems, information management, computer and management science to properly cover all facets of Very Large Business Applications. We encourage papers applying quantitative and qualitative, empirical and theoretical research methodologies such as case studies, action research, surveys, experiments, and design science.