End-User Information Systems, Innovation, and Organizational Change (SIGOSRA)


Track Chairs:

Frank Ulbrich, Northumbria University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Elizabeth Regan, University of South Carolina, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

This track focuses on advancing research and application of information and communication technologies in the end-user environment to support work processes, improve employee performance, and enhance overall organizational effectiveness in direct support of goals and strategies.
We invite research papers on topics related to integrating information and communication technologies in the workplace including end-user innovation, business process redesign/management, project management, technology training and support, industry specific applications, work group technologies, knowledge management as an end-user technology, and technology adoption, assimilation and use. Papers related to curriculum issues, service learning, and other pedagogical topics—including teaching cases—are also invited.

The track is open to all types of research. Best papers from the mini-tracks will be considered for submission to the Information Technology, Learning, and Performance Journal (ITLPJ).

Minitracks:

Applications of Web 2.0 and Social Media in Business and Education

Keane Lynn, University of South Carolina - Columbia, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track will focus on the applications of Web 2.0 and virtual technologies in the workplace and teaching. Web 2.0 has many definitions, but often refers to the next generation of web sites and applications that harness the power of the web for interactivity, collaboration, and data sharing. Examples include mashups, social networking sites, wikis, blogs, and user-customizable web sites, among many others. Many businesses and nonprofit organizations are recognizing the benefits of these and related technologies to improve operations and reach new clients or customers. Educators at the secondary and post-secondary levels are teaching these technologies or using them to enhance existing coursework. This mini-track solicits papers, demos, or workshops on Web 2.0 in business and education.

Consumerization of IT

Rob Nickerson, San Francisco State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Iris Junglas, Florida State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Erik Krogh, Claremont Graduate University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Thierry Jean Ruch, University of Goettingen, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Organizations are facing an expanding challenge in managing enterprise information technology: the consumerization of IT. The arrival of consumer-oriented devices and applications into the workplace (also called BYOD) is re-defining how corporate IT is adopted, delivered, and consumed. End-users have mastered new digital technologies enough to begin to assert their independence from the constraints that the IT department has previously put in place to ensure the compliance, security, and stability of the corporate IT platform. While there is little academic research on the consumerization of IT, numerous industry-oriented articles have appeared. This dearth of research publications highlights the need for theoretical and empirical investigation into this topic. The purpose of this minitrack is to provide a forum for presenting research in this new and important area.

End-User Involvement in IT Innovation and Organizational Change

Elizabeth A Regan, University of South Carolina - Columbia, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Business leaders expect better business processes, more productivity, and lower costs from technology. Helping the business grow is still the No.1 driver behind implementation of new technologies. Achieving these goals takes more than technology, however; it requires innovation and major changes to established ways of doing business. The challenges are evident across many industries and perhaps most notably in the current focus on transforming the U.S. healthcare system. Achieving improvement goals requires user involvement and buyin at all levels because it requires changing individual and work group behavior. Moreover, innovation is generally an iterative process that evolves over time as users gain insight into the potential of new technologies. This mini-track invites theoretical, empirical and descriptive (case studies) papers related to the role of end-users in achieving technology enabled innovation and business process transformation.

End-user Traning, Support, and Knowledge Management

Elizabeth A Regan, University of South Carolina - Columbia, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track will focus on user training, support, and knowledge management within and across organizations and cultures. Today’s anywhere, anytime work environment is made possible by a wide-range of increasingly sophisticated communications and knowledge management technologies. Knowledge management, along with a growing array of collaborative tools and social media, have become increasingly mainstream for managing today’s global enterprises. Moreover, the concept of managing end-user knowledge and expertise as an enterprise asset has proven both appealing and elusive. Now with the growth of big data and data mining, the concept of information or knowledge as a corporate asset has been gaining increasing credibility.  Managing knowledge assets across a diverse workforce requires technical know-how along with sensitivity to an organization’s culture, group dynamics, and individual work styles. Exploratory, theoretical, empirical and descriptive (case studies) papers related to end-user information technology, knowledge management, and knowledge as an asset are invited.

New Frontiers in Business Process Management

Thomas Kohlborn, Queensland University of Technology, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jens Poeppelbuss, University of Bremen, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oliver Mueller, University of Liechtenstein, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Maximilian Roeglinger, University of Augsburg, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Business processes management (BPM) is a management approach that has its roots in a range of practices, such as Kaizen, TQM, and BPR. It makes use of methods and tools dedicated to the identification, documentation, improvement, implementation, and execution of organizational processes. Although BPM has been a popular topic for decades, the field is still evolving. Current technological developments and environmental pressures extend the reach and richness of BPM beyond its traditional frontiers. Considering the reach of BPM, the growing importance of alliances and networks requires end-to-end business processes to be managed across multiple organizations. The roles of employees and customers also change, evolving to more active initiators and participants of process improvement endeavors. Organizations that previously refrained from adopting a systematic approach to manage their operations finally turn to BPM methods and technologies as well. Regarding the richness of BPM, new methods and tools are proposed that help organizations with the successful adoption of BPM. Current web-based technologies may increase the involvement of internal and external stakeholders and reduce organizational inertia. Improved analysis functionality like process mining can leverage organizational learning. This mini-track intends to serve as a platform for research on these current trends in BPM.

Transformation of Work: Working Smart with ICT

Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sehl Mellouli, Laval University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas, joseram, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

ICT is fundamentally changing the way we work and live. Historically, many people predicted that ICT may lead people to work at home reducing traffic time (telecommuting, telework, home office), to work at flexible hours increasing quality of life (flextime), and to work while moving accommodating personal needs (mobile work, mobile office), etc. However, most of these efforts were partially successful, at best, till now. With the ubiquitous networking capability and distributed intelligence provided by the advance of the Internet, efforts are now concerted to realize these ideal scenarios in practice. Smart work will directly affect individual workers and organizations as progresses are further being made into knowledge-based aging society. In the past, ICT have been speeding up the automation in industrialized processes. Today, ICT is re-defining the way organizations are delivering their services. Business processes are automated and ICT is supporting the way people are working. In coming knowledge-based society, work will be not only automated but transformed into something that we may not be able to imagine now. As we progress into new paradigm of work, novel performance assessment schemes need to be developed, different from what we have developed in the industrial age. In this regard, it is critical to review and identify changes we are experiencing, and further research into what will be happening in the future of work.

Understanding and Managing IS Innovation in Collaborative Networks

Joao Porto, de Albuquerque University of Sao Paulo, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Paul Drews, Department of Informatics, University of Hamburg, Germany, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Today’s organizations are highly interconnected in manifold kinds of collaborative networks, such as virtual organizations, enterprise alliances, business ecosystems, supply chains, ad-hoc networks (e.g. in disaster scenarios). Traditional approaches for IS/IT innovation management and organizational change can hardly be applied in this context, since they are generally focused on a single organization with well-defined borders. The design, management and deployment of IS innovations within and for such collaborative networks brings about important challenges for IS research. These challenges include adapting existing IS frameworks, methodologies and approaches to deal with the socio-technical complexity of collaborative networks. Socio-technical complexity arises in these networks not only from integrating a diversity of organizations and their corresponding information and technology infrastructures, but also from their interaction with people outside the organization boundaries and with society (e. g. by mobile devices and social media). This mini-track aims at providing a forum for research on methods for analyzing and intervening into collaborative networks that consider the tremendous size, geographical dispersion, socio-technical intertwining as well as the limited possibilities to influence these networks. We encourage conceptual, theoretical, methodological as well as empirical contributions towards understanding and managing IS innovations in collaborative networks.