Health Information Systems/Technology (SIGHealth)


Track Chairs:

Richard Klein, Florida International University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Guodong (Gordon) Gao, University of Maryland,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Information systems (IS) and technology (IT) innovations offer significant potential to improve quality and efficiency of care delivery, enable new forms of healthcare organizations, enhance interactions between patients and healthcare providers, and transform care delivery. However, to fully exploit the power of IS/IT within the healthcare sector requires overcoming significant challenges. Consistent with the 2013 conference theme, “Hyperconnected World—Anything, Anywhere, Anytime,” the focus of this track is on the design, implementation, adoption, and use of healthcare IS and IT, as well as quantifying their “hyperconnected” impacts on clinical and financial performance at the patient, physician, hospital/healthcare facility, and national levels. We welcome IS and IT studies from a variety of reference perspectives including computer science, economics, organizational behavior, public policy, software engineering, and strategy.

Minitracks:

Electronic Health Record Technology in Emergency Medical Services

C. Derrick Huang, Florida Atlantic University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jahyun Goo, Florida Atlantic University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Ravi S. Behara, Florida Atlantic University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Attila Hertelendy, Florida Atlantic University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Like their hospital counterparts, many EMS agencies use paper-based patient care reports and are transitioning to EHR.  EHR has the potential to improve EMS record availability and legibility for emergency room clinicians as well as to improve quality assurance, outcome research, and billing for EMS agencies.  Improved EMS information systems and integration with other electronic health record (EHR) systems were identified as a national priority in reports since 1998.  However, challenges remained.  The National EMS Information Systems focus has been at the national and state levels, not the local, agency level.  Moreover, current U.S. federal policies incentivizing the adoption of EHR by providers as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) do not provide support for EMS agencies.

Given the importance and the challenges of using EHR technology to improve EMS, this mini-track provides a platform for researchers and practitioners to submit original studies on adoption and implementation of EHR in EMS.

Electronic Medical Records in Ambulatory Care and Smaller Healthcare Practices

Ranganathan Chandrasekaran, University of Illinois at Chicago, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Balaji Sankaranarayanan, Bentley College, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Gary David, Bentley College, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are a critical component of the American health-care system. Compared to larger hospital settings, smaller ambulatory practices employ fewer physicians and face distinct challenges including resource constraints, technological bottlenecks and organizational challenges. Therefore, there is a growing need to understand the EMR issues in ambulatory settings and smaller healthcare practices. The focus of this mini-track is on research that furthers our understanding of the following in ambulatory care and smaller healthcare practices (1) systems, processes and strategies for implementing EMR (2) Electronic exchange of healthcare information among different stakeholders, (3) Integration of mobile devices and medical devices with healthcare systems 3) security and privacy issue associated with EMR in smaller practices. The mini-track is open to both completed and in-progress research, including broad survey articles, case studies, conceptual papers, descriptive reports, focused research issues or problems analyzed using a variety of tools and empirical methodologies.

Pharmacoinformatics for the Improvement of Pharmaceutical Services and Drug Discovery

Tagelsir Mohamed Gasmelseid, King Faisal University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The advances of information systems and technologies and web-based information sharing have raised expectations of healthcare organizations with regards to the use of such systems for the improvement of healthcare services. On the other hand, advances in information processing and representation have also raised the prospects of pharmaceutical companies to use advanced Pharmacoinformatics for protein engineering necessary for the design of new drug entities, medicinal chemistry and molecular analysis of therapeutics in pursuit of maximizing drug efficacy and  minimizing systemic toxicity and adverse events. Such developments suggest that integrated approaches for the management of pharmacy information and pharmacoinformatics applications are needed in order to enable all stakeholders to benefit from the rapidly expanding knowledge of pharmaceutical care services and potential drug and therapeutic targets. The workshop on Pharmaco-Informatics for Drug Discovery aims to provide a forum to share comprehensive techniques and approaches for the establishment of efficient and intelligent pharmacoinformatics for the improvement of pharmaceutical care services and drug discovery.

Role of Technology in Improving Health Care Delivery Processes

Diane Strong, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Bengisu Tulu, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Healthcare organizations have been redesigning processes and implementing various forms of information technology (IT) to increase productivity, lower costs, and improve the quality of care.  Unfortunately, the expected significant improvements in the quality of care and reductions in costs after large health IT investments are often not achieved.  Recognizing that significant improvements require more than just deploying IT, this mini-track seeks papers that investigate the role of IT in improving healthcare delivery processes and the opportunities and challenges in IT-enabled change in healthcare organizations.  The mini-track is open to papers on the challenges of achieving benefits from information systems and technologies in healthcare delivery, and how those benefits might best be achieved in and across a variety of healthcare settings (e.g., hospitals, ambulatory clinics, in the home).  It is also open to a variety of research methods including qualitative, quantitative, and design science approaches.  We are especially interested in interdisciplinary approaches, combining for example IT, process design, and managerial and policy initiatives.  Because the national context affects health care delivery choices, we are also interested in multi-national studies.

Smart Health and Wellbeing: Consumer-Centric Healthcare Systems

Bengisu Tulu, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Bernard Han, Western Michigan University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sharie Falan, Western Michigan University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Alan Rea, Western Michigan University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini track focuses on consumer centric health information systems that empower patients to manage their health better and maintain a healthier lifestyle. Examples of such systems include several non-clinical technologies such as web-based interfaces, mobile applications, social health technologies, medical devices such as accelerometers and sensors and clinical consumer centric technologies such as online patient portals, telehealth solutions, personal health records (PHR) and persuasive technologies provide consumers opportunities to manage their own care better and be active participants in their care teams. Through studying design requirements that are essential for usable consumer-centric health information systems and user expectations and attitudes towards these systems, we can better guide implementations and policy decisions. Papers may address discussions around system architectures, design and implementation of specific technologies, and socio-technical models that enable self-managed healthcare with continuous education for a diverse set of populations.

Successful and Sustainable Mobile Health( mHealth) Solutions

Ton Spil, University of Twente, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sweta Sneha, Kennesaw State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Nilmini Wickramasinghe, RMIT University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

In the wake of the 21st century, healthcare systems around the globe are faced with several complex challenges including: providing quality care to an aging population, exponentially rising costs(approximately 17% of GDP in US), and limited financial as well as human resources. Mobile Health(mHealth), refers to the integration of mobile information communication and multimedia technologies for healthcare delivery and practice. This opens the door for pervasive anytime, anywhere, for anyone delivery of healthcare services. Although the potential for the far reaching impact of mHealth/eHealth is indisputable, the key lies in realizing this vision. The objective of this minitrack is to address these issues by soliciting work-in-progress and completed research papers covering technical, organizational, behavioral, economical, and managerial perspectives on mHealth and/or mhealth combined with ehealth that: (1) assess the infrastructure issues towards supporting mHealth/eHealth, (2) propose and/or evaluate the design, development, and implementation of successful mHealth/ehealth applications, (3) assess the impact of mHealth/eHealth applications on patients, doctors, healthcare organizations, and society in general, and (4) develop theories to better understand the phenomenon of mHealth/eHealth. Successful papers maybe fast tracked for a special issue in Health and Technology and/or Intl. J. Networking and Virtual Organisations.

Telemedicine: Advances, Opportunities, and Challenges for Information Systems

Ann Fruhling, University of Nebraska at Omaha, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Richard Burkhard, San Jose State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Monica Chiarini Tremblay, Florida International University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Telemedicine is defined as the use information technologies (such as video, audio, and sensor devices) to provide clinical care to patients from health care providers that are not geographically near. In reality, the use of digital data and video in medical applications has a long history, but due to recent advances in network infrastructure and the dramatically improved computer capabilities available to patients, there has been a remarkable increase in the application of telemedicine. This mini-track provides a focused outlet at AMCIS for consumer health informatics researchers to share and discuss the results of their work. Research is welcomed on any work that focuses on users (health consumers, medical professionals, healthcare providers, and others) and related usability. Various methodologies (design science, qualitative, and quantitative work) are encouraged.