Research Methods


Track Chairs:

Joerg Evermann, Memorial University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Joseph Walls, University of Michigan,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Chris Street, University of Regina,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

The IS field continues to mature and has embraced a wide range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. However, methods continue to evolve both in concept and application. This track focuses on the processes and procedures by which discovery and creation of new knowledge pertaining to information systems is conducted. The track is particularly interested in examples of innovative application of methodological techniques as well as discourse and description of particular methodological improvements.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to use of multiple methods in coordinated research streams or in a single study; examining whether problems that have been historically through particular approaches, such as experiments or surveys, could be re-envisioned using other techniques; best, contingent, or recommended approaches to specific qualitative methods or  quantitative methods;  what IS research learn from the recently developed methods used in reference disciplines and what can it contribute to these and other disciplines;  role of theory, ethical considerations, the use of software tools for data analysis, and related strategies;  and methodological and ethical considerations for the creation, sharing and reuse of large datasets from data available in the public domain.

Minitracks:

Design Science Research

Wendy Lucas, Bentley University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Tamara Babaian, Bentley University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Justin L Bond, Auburn University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Chetan S. Sankar, Auburn University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The Design Science (DS) research methodology provides an effective complement to the behavioral research methods traditionally employed by the IS research community by focusing on problem solving and the utility of artifacts that embody a solution to a problem. The seminal work of Hevner et al. (2004) suggests that artifacts in DS include both the process of design and the outcomes of the design processes. Recognizing the opportunities that the design science research paradigm opens for the field of Information Systems, this minitrack aims to demonstrate how DS research provides a critical link between IS research and practice. In building on burgeoning interest within the IS community, the minitrack will provide a forum for the exchange of innovative research at this juncture. Papers on the methodology of DS research in IS, including works that critically evaluate the utility of using design science research as a methodology for enhancing systems analysis and design theories and practice, are particularly welcome.

Paradigmatic Diversity in IS Studies and its Implications for Research Quality

Kerry Ward, University of Nebraska at Omaha, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The IS community has become more receptive to multiple research approaches after such seminal works as Allen Lee’s essay on integrating positivist and interpretive approaches and Minger’s emphasis on the value of the plurality of paradigms. What exactly constitutes high quality research is not without controversy. Determining research quality can vary greatly based on the ontological and epistemological assumptions of the perspective and  IS research best practices and standards are still being debated. Increased diversity places a greater burden on the author to communicate the quality of their work to consumers who may not share the author’s research approach. This minitrack explores the need to debate what constitutes research quality and best practice, particularly across approaches.

This mini-track fosters discussion related to difficult and controversial issues related to determining research quality. We encourage authors to submit conceptual or empirical research related to a wide variety of issues. These issues can be conceptual such as how to integrate interpretivist and positivist approaches or detailed methodological discussions such as the recent exploration into the appropriateness of formative and reflective constructs in quantitative modeling. We encourage any submission that fosters discussion and understanding of research quality, best practices and appropriate use of methods.

Research Methods for a Cumulative Research Tradition: A cumulative tradition?

Mary Tate, Victoria University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

David Johnstone, Victoria University of Wellington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

It has been suggested that research in information systems is piling up rather than building up. Summarising and synthesizing previous literature is inexact and often subjective; building a genuinely cumulative tradition is difficult; and applying rigorous quantitative techniques to the accumulating weight of evidence for specific theories is nearly impossible. Further, as a field, we are frequently unwilling to take a revisionist approach to past research, or to publish replication studies.

This mini-track will focus on quantitative and qualitative research methods for building a cumulative tradition. Theoretical and methodological contributions; and interesting empirical illustrations are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to: novel approaches for extending and combining theories and presenting past literature, quantitative meta-analysis and Bayesian analysis, replications, revisionist and contrarian studies. We aim to advance the discourse of what constitutes a cumulative tradition, and offer an outlet for innovative and non-traditional studies.