System Analysis and Design (SIGSAND)


Track Chairs:

Gove Allen, Brigham Young University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Palash Bera, Saint Louis University,,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

H. Roland Weistroffer, Virginia Commonwealth University,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Track Description:

Systems analysis is about analyzing business problems and opportunities and identifying possible solutions, whereas systems design is specifying how an identified solution can be implemented, specifically as it involves information technology. The combined field of Systems Analysis and Design deals with all issues related to the development of systems and as such is of central importance to the information systems discipline. The SIGSAND track provides a forum for discussing research related to systems development methodologies and the methods used and activities occurring throughout the systems development life cycle. This includes requirements determination, modeling techniques and languages, agile systems development practices, empirical evaluation of analysis and design methods, user involvement in systems development, open source development, design of systems architecture, and other technical and organizational issues in systems development.

Minitracks:

Analysis and Design for Service-Oriented Enterprises

Padmal Vitharana, Syracuse University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Kumar Bhaskaran, IBM, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Hemant Jain, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Enabled by the recent advances in web services, business process automation, and service-oriented architectures, organizations around the world have embarked on the development of the next-generation enterprise infrastructures, referred to by some as ""Service-Oriented Enterprises"". Essentially, service-oriented enterprises are organizations that take advantage of service-oriented computing to build capability to quickly respond to changing business environment. Gartner termed this as enterprise agility defined as ""the ability of an organization to sense environmental change and respond efficiently and effectively to that change."" Currently, there are many open research issues on the analysis and design for the service-oriented enterprises that need attention from the MIS community. This minitrack provides a forum for researchers and practitioners who are interested in presenting their work in this area. The suggested topics are found in, although not limited to, the following list:

Analysis and design of business services
Best practices in analysis and design for service-oriented enterprises
Business modeling in service-oriented enterprises
Centrality of information in service-oriented enterprises
Componentization of businesses
Enterprise services for business process automation
Innovative paradigms and techniques in support of flexible business processes
Language issues in service-oriented computing</li>Modeling of process services
Modular service composition (or enterprise service mash-ups)
Service modeling and catalog management
Service-oriented system analysis and design techniques
Service reuse in application development
Web service composition in support of collaboration

Contemporary Issues in Agile Development

VenuGopal Balijepally, Oakland University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sridhar Nerur, University of Texas at Arlington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RadhaKanta Mahapatra, University of Texas at Arlington, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Agile manifesto, which introduced agile methodologies, is now more than a decade old. During this period, these methodologies have seen increased acceptance among software developers. This brings to the fore a number of research issues—adoption and/or adaptation of agile methods, agile project management, social aspects of agile development, distributed agile development, scalability of agile methodologies, and enterprise agility, to name but a few. The incorporation of myriad practices, particularly those advocated by lean principles, has only rendered the term ""agility"" more nebulous. Prospective research topics include lean and agile practices and their synergies/differences, and the role of agile/lean principles in facilitating flexible enterprise architectures. Considering the rapid growth of agile development practices, the Project Management Institute (PMI) recently introduced a new certification program focused on agile project management. This is expected to further consolidate and spread the use of agile development. Some illustrative project management aspects of agile development in need of research attention include cost and schedule estimation/planning, resource allocation, risk management, and change control management. This mini-track will provide a forum for researchers to address fundamental issues regarding agile development practices as well as contemporary topics raised by its widespread acceptance and use.

Methodologies and Processes

Solomon Antony, Murray State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Akhilesh Bajaj, University of Tulsa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Dinesh Batra, Florida International University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The study of methodologies and processes used in IS Development is a research area of central importance in the information systems field. The scope of this mini-track ranges from the formative aspects of information systems development to the “core” concepts in SA&D, finally to delivery of the information system product. Also included are methodologies of work process analysis as well as distributed and global aspects of teamwork in the process of IS development. This mini-track is intended to bring together researchers studying technical, empirical, cognitive, pedagogical, theoretical, and applied aspects of IS Development methodologies and to highlight the continuing fundamental position of systems analysis and design in the IS discipline. Papers can cover a variety of topics such as design and development of lightweight mobile applications, methodologies for creating applications from web services, incorporating agility in IS development methodologies, balancing plan-based and agile methods, issues in managing globally distributed projects, and improving project management practices to address success dimensions such as scope, schedule, costs, and quality.

Modeling Methods, Techniques, and Languages

John E Erickson, University of Nebraska at Omaha, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Keng L Siau, Missouri University of Science and Technology, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Xin Tan, Fairleigh Dickinson University - Metropolitan Campus This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

This mini-track recognizes the importance role modeling methods and languages plays in the systems development process as well as a continuing thematic relevance to systems developers, modelers, and theorists.  The mini-track highlights the ongoing growth and creativity in this field. Having been a successful AMCIS and SIGSAND component since 2003, the mini-track provides a forum for researchers, educators, and practitioners working in the areas of systems analysis and design, method engineering, and modeling language development, use, modification, and assessment. This mini-track also serves as an outlet for studies in theory development, design science, and behavioral science. An objective is to work toward a more standardized set of concepts which would in turn benefit researchers, educators, and practitioners in this field. In that light we welcome both technical and empirical pieces, and are open to all aspect of research methods (e.g., survey, experimentation, case studies, action research, etc.).